Adopt Don’t Shop

by Divya Bhardwaj

Many people who want a dog prepare by researching the amount of money, work, and time having a dog will take. This is fine. However, some people do the additional step of immediately scoping out breeders to buy a dog from, without giving dogs at shelters a chance. This is not fine.

People looking to adopt a dog should at least consider adopting one from a shelter instead of buying one from a breeder. There are myths about dogs from shelters that say things like all shelter dogs have rabies, are aggressive, cannot be trained, and many more that I do not even want to bring attention to. While this is true for some dogs at shelters, there are many who are perfectly healthy, friendly, and loving. Plus, dogs from breeders often have even worse issues due to their history of inbreeding, such as liver problems, respiratory problems, overbites, and more. Even if your particular breeder says they don’t inbreed, that can’t erase the centuries of inbreeding that came before. Therefore, the shelter dogs should be given a chance to get out of the shelter and find a permanent home. They should not be counted out just due to their rough pasts. The dogs with rougher pasts and trauma also deserve homes, but it is okay if that is not a commitment you want to make, since there are many healthy, happy dogs who just want to be loved. When you just buy dogs from breeders, you are denying these dogs a second chance at life without even taking them into consideration.

Additionally, shelters are facing a constant struggle of not having enough room or resources to care for all the animals brought there. When you adopt a dog, you are helping to lessen this problem. When you buy a dog, you are simply making the problem worse by contributing to breeders who cause the problem of all these homeless dogs in the first place. Breeders run a business, so they are mainly oriented on the money; therefore, they sell dogs to anyone who pays them even if they are clearly unfit to be their owners, leading to abandonment and other issues. However, shelters screen owners to make sure they are going to be responsible owners. Many people see this screening as a deterrent, but it is actually easier to adopt dogs than breeders would want you to think.

          Overall, while there are many people who are animal lovers who do get dogs from breeders, the option for adopting should be considered and the reason for not adopting shouldn’t be a false misconception.