The Deceit of Clickbait

by Kathy Wang

Clickbait is a huge problem in the Internet world. Though it may not cause a huge problem in your everyday life, it can cause some frustrations when you are inclined to click on an article due to its deceptive nature. Here are a couple of examples that may cause jaws to be dropped, but in reality, may not be what you had in mind.

  1. Hillary Clinton Is Dying

Cickbait_1.jpg

When faced with this shocking article headline, one might think that Hillary Clinton is actually dying, perhaps due to a terminal illness or something up to that great of an extreme. However, this clickbait article is just displaying a nice picture of her dy(e)ing a t-shirt with her VP buddy, Senator Kaine.

  1. President Obama is in HOT WATER

Clickbait_2.jpg

Although this may be a popular expression for saying that someone is in trouble, this clickbait-y article made it the literal meaning. How nice that President Obama is chilling with his buddy Biden in a hot tub.

  1. Why You Should Forget Everything You Learned at HB

You shouldn’t. It’s clickbait. This article is intriguing due to the shocking statement that its title makes. Though you may be persuaded to click on articles making interesting statements like these, it may turn out to be a hoax just for the company who displayed article to get ad revenue or to sell their sketchy product. In the end, you might never know why you should “forget everything you learned at HB”.

  1. Galaxy Note 7 Blowing Up Planes

Clickbait_3.jpg

A seemingly clickbait-y title is actually somewhat true to its name.

  1. You’ll Never Guess What Happened After Lindsay Lohan Went on a Boat!

Clickbait_4.jpg

This clickbait is true again, since Lindsay Lohan did go on a boat, and the news of what happened is pretty shocking—her finger got caught on an anchor and was severed. She was rushed to the ER where her finger was then reattached.

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/lindsay-lohan-lost-half-of-her-finger-in-a-boating-accident_us_57f24ddbe4b082aad9bbf120

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/06/business/southwest-samsung.html?_r=0