Working Girl: Tips for Getting a Summer Job

By Faith Griggs

Summer is right around the corner, and many of us have plans. Some of you are taking summer classes (I’m so sorry), and others are doing summer science programs (I’m so so sorry). Then there are vacations, summer camps, college visits, and looking for summer jobs. That last one is tricky though. How many of us actually know how to write a resume, or even know how apply in general? It’s confusing, that’s for sure, and if you don’t have help, it can be downright stressful. No need to worry though, I’m here to guide you through this process until you get the hang of it.

Step 1. Apply, apply, apply!

It’s simple and somewhat insulting of me to point out that you can’t get the job if you don’t apply for it in the first place, but I have to say it anyway. Job applications are straightforward and have an average length of one to two pages. You won’t need to write a lot, as all you need to do is add in your basic information, your availability, and you past work experiences. If you ask for an application in person, not all places will have a paper copy as it’s much more popular for people to apply online now. Despite the convenience, it’s harder to get a feel for who’s hiring you and what you’re going in for in comparison to just walking in and asking for one yourself. So I’d suggest you do whatever works for you, as long as you don’t give up on the application itself!

2. They asked for a resume?

Most places that are hiring teenagers in the first place don’t usually ask for a resume, but if you happen to find a place that does, here’s a quick how to. Resumes are to be one page, one sided. In the top left corner, put your name, address, phone number, and e-mail so you can be contacted by the place you applying to. The resume itself is basically a summary of what you want (the job), you’re education (current grade in high school), and bullet point lists of past work experiences, interests, and achievements. Keep it short and simple.

3. Now what?

Wait. Check your e-mail regularly and be patient. If you’re really concerned, you can call or e-mail the store, restaurant, or wherever yourself to check up on the process. You might get the job, you might not. If you do, congrats! You’re now employed. If you don’t, don’t get discouraged. It might take multiple tries before anything happens. Good luck!