The HB Community Weighs In on the Gun Control Debate

One of the most controversial issues in politics currently is gun control. In the wake of recent shootings across the country, a range of opinions has been voiced about what role the government should play in gun control. 

            Some Hathaway Brown students shared their opinions on what the United States should do to prevent future gun-related tragedies, or whether anything should be done at all. Sophomore Marta Baker suggested that “all guns, regardless of where they’re being bought, should be subjected to background checks. It’s not a violation of anyone’s privacy. We need to crack down on any illegal guns.” Zoe Farkas agreed, stating “a background check is the most important thing.” A junior, who wished to remain anonymous, had a different point of view regarding the role of guns in American life. “I feel like it’s cliché saying ‘guns don’t kill people, people kill people’ ”, she said, “but just because you restrict gun usage doesn’t mean that people can’t kill each other anyway, so you should work to educate people on gun control, instead.”

            A few teachers were also willing to voice their opinions. “I don’t think that regular people should have guns, period. Unless there is an absolute reason for a person to have a gun, such as for law enforcement, there is no need,” stated Ms. Mietus. Ms. Hu also weighed in on the issue, saying “when I came here, the first thing I was concerned about were the guns in America. My dad told me that even though America has gun rights, the number of crimes here is much less than that of many other countries.”

 

Some things you may not have known about guns in America:

 

For every 100 people in the United States, there are 101.05 guns.

 

In the US, there were 28,874 gun deaths in 1999. In 2011, there were 33,163; this number generally increases each year.

 

In the United Kingdom, 0.79 per 100,000 people die from guns per year on average. In the United States, 10.3 per 100,000 people die from guns.

 

The gun-related death rate in the United States is greater than that of any other industrialized country.

Kate Agan